All About the Authors

Helping edit, publish, and market your book.

Tag: get published

Transforming Your Thoughts Into a Published Work

By Dr. Patricia Fitzhugh

When my ex-husband initially uttered the words “the move” on our 19th wedding anniversary, I had no idea that the events in the days following would become a published memoir of my middle-aged marital experience. These are just a few notes about my first publishing experience.

What prompted me to start writing?

I started writing this book, The Move, Memoirs of a Mid-Life Marital Crisis, five years ago but I didn’t start off with the intention of publishing a book. I was journaling about my feelings of anger, sadness, depression and the swift changes that were occurring in my life at the time. I decided to capture my raw emotions and feelings on a daily basis. Most of my inspiration to write came from reading about other people who had similar experiences, their stories were the ones that helped me want to share mine and help someone else just as others had helped me.

What were some of the steps I took to transform my notes into a book?

  1. I kept journaling until I ran out of words. This process is sometimes referred to as emptying out. Once my mind and heart were empty, I knew that this particular book was finished.
  2.  It took over two years to complete the editing process. Some of the editing was grammatical while other edits were content related.  I sought guidance from other writers who encouraged me to consider the level and extent of the details from my personal journal that I wanted to include in the book. I had to ask myself questions like, “How much of my life did I want to expose to the world?” Some of the content in my journal was explicit and I had to consider how this information would affect my children in the present and future. I also had to be sure that the content in the book was intended to serve as a mechanism for helping others and not hurting the people who may have been portrayed negatively.
  3. I turned the manuscript over to the publisher once I completed my edits. My book was self-published, so most of the work done by the publishing company included editing, formatting, cover design, printing, filing paperwork for the copyright, obtaining the ISBN number, getting the book online with Amazon, designing marketing materials, and announcing the book release.

 How did I find a publisher?

Many years ago when I first starting hosting women’s conferences, one of the speakers we invited to participate in the conference had a publishing company. She had published books by some of the other speakers that attended the conference over the course of several years. She also facilitated workshops about transforming manuscripts into a book. While my schedule didn’t afford me the opportunity to attend these workshops, the publisher had videos and a publishing guide on her website about the process that included pricing and a choice of plans. I was able to read about the process and research the services she offered. I would recommend you ask questions of friends who have published one or more books about their experience — both pros and cons.

What happened once I released my book?

I released The Move in 2016 at my first Women’s Expo in Baltimore, Maryland. It was a great experience primarily because I came to the realization that I didn’t know anything about promoting and selling a book.

Here are some key questions to consider when you are ready to release your book:

  1. What set’s your book apart from others in the same genre?
  2. Why should someone buy your book?
  3. How are you going to engage a person in a conversation to peak interest about your book and close the sale?

Here I was at a huge expo with a box of books and no plan. I thought people would just want to buy my book because it was me, “Dr. Patty”. Well, that wasn’t the case. Let me share with you some of the things I learned during this very important experience.

  1.  If you are going to sell your book at an event you must know the demographic of those registered or attending the event. I thought my demographic was middle-aged women 35 to 55 years old. However, when I got to the event, I learned was that most of the women ages 45 to 55 were already past the stages within my book. My demographic was women ages 35 to 40.
  2. Don’t rush your release. When you rush to get your book released you may not maximize all of your marketing resources. A marketing plan is necessary so that you can be sure to position your product to get in front of the right people. You also want to consider a social media plan and a profit plan.

 Is there anything I would have done differently on the release of this project?

In the next phase of my book promotion, I have actually worked on developing a marketing plan, social media plan and determined how much revenue I want to generate from book sales for the existing year. These tools will help me to reposition my product, monetize my message and establish benchmarks.

I hope these tips help you with publishing your book!

 Dr. Patricia “Patty” Fitzhugh is a speaker, entrepreneur, author, leadership consultant, television and radio host, women’s advocate, and visionary. But first and foremost, she’s a humanitarian who is committed to helping others find hope and offering her voice for human rights. For nearly 25 years, Dr. Fitzhugh has used personal life experiences and overcome challenges to inspire many to do the same. She is CEO of It’s A New Day, LLC, an organization she founded in 2013 now based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  The company is the media and brand marketing organization for Dr. Patty CARES, Dr. Patty LIVE, and Dr. Patty SPEAKS and produces a weekly Internet television show and blog talk radio show, Managing Mid-Life and Morning Coffee with Dr. Patty. This is her first book.

Contact her at 443-924-MLRC or by email at info@drpattycares.com.

7 Essential Tech Tools That All Writers Need To Have

Laptop on deskIt’s now easier than ever for writers to take their work from an idea to a published manuscript. The advances in technology and rise of the Internet offer a platform for authors that’s creating a self-publishing revolution. Additionally, websites like www.AllAbouttheAuthors.com help guide you through the process.

There is also a vast array of wonderful apps and tech tools that support writers during all stages of their writing. These seven are essential for modern authors and will help you make your book into something that will take the world by storm.

Scrivener 

By far the most comprehensive tool on the market, Scrivener is a word processing app on steroids. It allows you to set up a personalized writing studio that includes a virtual cork board and summary tags. You can easily organize research, write documents, and edit them individually or as a group. 

The outliner tool allows you to create synopses and metadata for each piece of work so they can be easily navigated. This is perfect for those writing books because you can divide the manuscript into smaller sections while keeping a detailed overview of the whole project. It’s also great for freelancers who are working with multiple clients at once.

Wunderlist

Wunderlist is a fantastically useful online to-do list. Each point opens up an individual card where you can add additional comments, files, due dates and reminders. It also allows you to network with teams for collaborative projects and easily assign different tasks to members. 

Any author knows that the actual writing of your book is only a miniscule part of the process, so having a tool that can help you organize all of your marketing, liaising, planning and formatting as well is infinitely useful.

ExpressVPN

 For writers, your computer is the most precious piece of equipment you own. Due to this, keeping it safe and secure is an essential pursuit. One of the greatest dangers to a writer’s online security comes from the necessary evil of relying on public WiFi. Whether it’s having an intensive writing session in your local coffee shop or checking emails on the train, these notoriously insecure networks are hard to avoid.

Using a VPN such as ExpressVPN is a great way to secure yourself when out-and-about because it encrypts all of your data and allows you to browse without any risk. It also lets you bypass geo-blocking restrictions, which can be an added bonus when performing research.

 F.lux

 For authors, a large amount of the day is spent staring at a computer screen.  While this is when the magic happens, it also takes a nasty toll on your eyes. F.lux is a truly handy tool that, once installed, adjusts the tones and brightness of your screen based on time of day to help reduce the damaging affect.

It’s also great for those of us who find ourselves writing into the early hours of the morning. It does so by naturally dimming the lights. It encourages you to adhere to your circadian rhythms and sleep better. 

Hemingway

The Hemingway readability software is a wonderful tool that helps you clean up your manuscript after the first draft. Providing a user-friendly system that highlights words and phrases in different colors, you can get an objective view of how well your work reads.

Yellow highlights overly complex sentences. Red means it’s too long and meandering to understand. Other colors represent other areas of your writing that demand your attention. I’d never recommend you rely on this completely but it does provide a useful alternative perspective.

Cold Turkey

One of the greatest pitfalls for authors is distraction. We live in a world of constant connection to our friends, colleagues, and unlimited entertainment. This is why Cold Turkey is perhaps ones of the most useful tools in a writer’s arsenal.

Its bulletproof format allows you to schedule blocks on specific websites or even your work email. It is very difficult to stop, edit or uninstall the program once the timer has begun. This means you can easily get into an intensive writing session without anything drawing your attention away.

Writer’s App

 Creativity is something that can’t be scheduled; often you can find yourself in the most inconvenient situations when a moment of brilliance comes to you. Writer’s App is an easy-to-use planning software for novelists, which lets you jot down ideas for books in an organized and easily-navigable manner.

The user interface was presented as a work desk. Books are organized by title and, once opened, have sub-sections for plot, characters and others, or can be viewed by chapters. As simple as this app is, it truly is one of the most useful tools available for brainstorming ideas.

Do you know of any other tools that deserve a place on this list? Have you used any of the tools listed above and want to share your thoughts? Be sure to leave a comment below, as I’d love to hear your ideas!

About the Author: Caroline is an entertainment blogger for Culture Coverage. She’s written all throughout her life and is probably working on some project right now. She loves how technology has revolutionized the way we write!

Want to write a guest post for All About the Authors? We welcome guest posts from authors and those who are experts in the book industry. What is your writing process? Where are you in your publishing journey and what advice do you have? Have you successfully marketed your book and do you have tips to share? All About the Authors wants to hear from you! If you’re interested in submitting a guest post to All About the Authors, please send your information and topic idea to allabouttheauthors@gmail.com with the subject line “Guest Post” or comment here.

 

The Good News About Audiobooks

One of my clients received what we thought was the golden ticket – an amazing agent agreed to represent his thriller. This agent is one of the top sellers in the business, and he immediately submitted my client’s book to the top editors at all the major publishing houses. Days later, the rejections poured in containing all completely different (and sometimes contradictory) reasons for passing on the book. After many almosts, there were just as quickly no more editors and houses to whom he could submit. The golden ticket was no more.

This is more common than you think. While many think that getting an agent assures a publishing deal, the most successful agents sell only twelve projects a year. That’s a pretty small number when you think about it.

But we could go on and on for years about the state of publishing and the subjectiveness of the business, as my writer/editor/agent friends and I often do. The topic of this piece, however, is not about the heartbreak of all that, but of next steps. My client is self-publishing, and we’re hoping that with a great product will come sales.

61VrXXqyR-L._AA160_What Jim learned in doing his research on the subject was the rise of audiobooks. It turns out that Andy Weir, self-publishing author of the widly successful book The Martian, was discovered thanks to his audio book. A small audio book publisher found Andy’s book online, and acquired the audio rights to his book and produced a great product.

Audiobooks is the fastest growing segment of the book publishing business. I recently have become a convert as well, discovering audible.com through a Groupon. Thanks to smartphones and digital audio files, the days of old books on tape and carrying around packs of cds are no longer necessary, although libraries and other places still offer them. I downloaded a Great Courses twenty-two hour class on Medieval History, and Mindy Kaling’s book Why Not Me? As a person who works all day and is a single parent, I don’t have a lot of time for books until bed, when I can manage about fifteen minutes before I fall into a coma. But with audiobooks, I can take the dog for a walk and listen to a book, make dinner while listening to a book, and do everything else that needs doing around the house and garden. There are free apps too through the library (OverDrive) and other servers including audiobooks.com

According to Marketwatch, some books are selling better in audio than in print, sometimes by as much as four times.
61QXHDkPucL._AA160_To me, the narrator is key. I am a huge Bill Bryson fan, however, as much as I love the man as writer, I found his actual voice, when reading his own audiobooks, grating (sorry Bill!). So when his latest book came out, The Road to Little Dribbling, I checked it out on audio to listen to a sample of the book, and I saw and heard that this book has a narrator named Nathan Osgood. His voice is delightful and he conveys the author’s irascible and grouchy nature charmingly– the perfect match to the author. Another great narrator is Caroline Lee, who reads Kate Morton’s The Lake House.
So now Jim is looking into not only self publishing his book with a print edition, but getting an audiobook as well. I connected him with my former neighbor, and former Charlotte news anchorman Alan Taylor, who now has with a booming business narrating audiobooks through ACX (Audiobook Creation Exchange). ACX in an online marketplace that connects authors, narrators, and producers. You can upload portions of your book and narrators can give you a sample. Publishers Weekly 51PAt8O-8CL._AA160_  has a very useful article on how to indie publish an audiobook, associated costs, and royalties.

Check it out, and let us know what you think about audiobooks.

 

 

 

You Can’t Please Everybody

This morning I was taking a look at the recent book publishing deals that have been made on Publisher’s Marketplace. The information listed is very short: title of the book, author name, a one-sentence description, the name of the agent who sold the book, and the editor who bought the book.

You can do a search by genre, and since my women’s fiction/romance book is being submitted this week by my agent, I wanted to see what books had been sold in the last two months, and who some of the editors were who were buying them. What first came to mind is: Who knew Cattlemen were so sexy? It seems like fifty% of the books sold in this genre in the last two months featured cattlemen and Texas. Having spent three years in Houston, TX, I can assure you I have no desire to romanticize anything about living there. However, a bunch of successful romance writers clearly feel differently.

My fear is that an up and coming writer may take a look at that list, and slap herself in the face, moaning, “Oh no! Cattlemen? Why was I writing a sweet romance that takes place in a bakery in Virginia! I’ve missed the boat! Cattlemen are what’s selling now.”

You may remember this phenomenon happening when the Twilight series came out, and suddenly everybody thought: “I must write books about moody vampires!” And then The Hunger Games, “I must write about a dystopian future world with a strong female lead!” This is the wrong road to go down for two reasons:

  • The publishing cycle is long. Unless you write very quickly, all the editors who just bought books on cattlemen have pretty much filled up their lists with these books already. By the time you finish your book, find an agent, and submit, these books are already published and the editors have moved on to another hot topic.
  • Don’t write on trend. Write what you want to write – the book you want to read. Your heart won’t be in it if you are writing for a rapidly moving market. And given that you’re probably writing in your spare time, is this a project you’re really interested in?

51n9fRCno3L._AA160_

  • You Can’t Please Everybody. I submit this to you if you’re in a book group: How often does everyone love the book that was picked out for that month’s read. I can count a handful of times (in my book group, we all loved The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, Where’d You Go Bernadette? And the list ends there.) People have different tastes. You may love dystopian books, while your best friend loves only realistic literary fiction. Some love history books, and others purely escapist cozy mysteries. The world of books and reading is large, with enough great books to cater to every type of reader.
  • Even agents don’t agree on what works. Agents and editors turn down books all the time that go on to sell a lot of books. My first boss in publishing turned down Like Water for Chocolate, and used to say, “What do I know? I’m the schmuck who turned down Like Water for Chocolate?” But he was also the schmuck who published Hilary Mantel, Reynolds Price, and Isabelle Allende. So you win some, you lose some. It’s all about taking a risk on a project you’re passionate about.

41HGJKFdW3L._AA160_So don’t fall for beating yourself up about what’s hot, what’s selling, what’s marketable. Write the book that’s important to you. Not everyone is going to love it, but for the people who do, it will be something they can spend time with during a long commute, a lazy weekend day, or up late at night, turning the pages. Your work will be a companion, an escape, a glimpse into another world, an eye-opener, and maybe in inspiration.

 

 

 

 

What Do Literary Agents Do for an Author?

 

Many of my clients feel overwhelmed by the prospect of book publishing. How is it possible for an unknown writer to access the big, untouchable editors and publishing houses in New York? They worry that you have to know someone in order to get published. Without good connections, it seems, the process of getting a book contract from an established publisher is unreachable.

That’s where literary agents come in. They are the gatekeepers for publishers. The “Big Five” publishers (Penguin Random House, Simon and Schuster, Hachette, Macmillan, and HarperCollins) in New York do not have time to read unsolicited manuscripts from the tens of thousands of authors (if not hundreds of thousands) who are looking to get published every year. Instead they have relationship with trusted literary agents, who are known for their reputation to find great writers and book projects, and match them up with the perfect editor.

Almost every literary agent (except those who are closed to submissions) is accessible to authors through their submissions policies. Query them via email, and if they are interested, they will write you back and ask to see a sample of your manuscript or a whole manuscript. It’s vitally important that your query letter is professional, follows the format the agent is looking for, and is compelling enough for the agent to want to read more.

If you are lucky enough to get an agent, they may or may not help you to tweak your manuscript to get it ready to submit. Most agents prefer books that are “turn-key” – in other words, that are ready to be turned around and sent out the next day. But some agents think that they can improve the manuscript in some small way, and work with you to make the book more marketable (note, this is rare, and more true in the case of nonfiction). Then they will come up with a submissions list of where they will try to sell your book, pitch your book, and hopefully find a home for your book.In my video about this subject to be posted this week, I’ll be discussing many of the ways literary agents help their clients, what to expect out of the relationship, what not to expect, a typical contract they might ask you to sign, and what to do if the relationship is no longer working.

 

 

Ghostwriters – Not Just for the Infamous

You might know about ghostwriters from when a famous reality star has her fifteen minutes of fame, and is asked to write a book about her life. Remember Snookie? The naked guy from 51eHkxgZWNL._SX413_BO1,204,203,200_Survivor? A Real Housewife? Most of these people are not writers.57cadcd00ab945ecb4d1722a3518c132.1500

 

How about the football star who is the winning quarterback in the Superbowl? Everyone wants to know his story, how he went from scrawny eight year old to multi-talented (and super-model-esque) to seemingly invincible hero.

Or, you may have heard that when a politician is running for office, he signs a deal to write a feel good story about his all-American upbringing hi51DV+gcn-6L._AA160_s rags to riches tale, his manifesto of how he wants to make America right again. Most politicians are not writers, or they simply don’t have the time to sit down and write it.

What these scenarios have in common is that the “author” needs to hire a ghostwriter. But ghostwriters aren’t just for the famous (or infamous). A lot of my clients are doctors, psychologists, retired professional athletes, nutritionists, people who have overcome adversity and have a tale to tell, or people who have a great idea that they want to share. Many are speakers and businessmen and women who want to share their ideas in book form, and leave the listeners at conferences where they speak a lasting reminder of their day with them.51HvjG7mukL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

Many people on the speakers’ circuit actually need a book in order to get bookings. Businesses and charities who book speakers like to have books as a give-away (ensuring sales) and it gives the speaker cache that they are published authors.

So many dream of writing a book, but do not have the time or ability. Enter the ghost-writer. We come from various backgrounds, but many of us come from either journalism, or have always been authors, or are former book publishing editors, like me. We work in a variety of ways, but generally we spend time interviewing the author, read their papers, listen to their speeches. We try to capture the voice and the vision of the author and turn it into the best it can be.

To find out more about the costs of a ghost-writer, the time you need to spend with the ghost-writers, and tricky topics like who gets credit and where, become a subscribing member, and watch my video, which will post this week.

The Worst Advice We’ve Heard About Book Publicity

megaphone-kid-cropped1You must do a book tour

Ask a handful of published authors or better yet, go to a local book signing and discover why book tours aren’t a must for most authors. Unless you have an established following or are part of a larger group such as a YA panel, a book signing may be a bust. Bookstores depend on authors to bring in a crowd and often underestimate attendance.  I represented a Nashville author who wanted help arranging his book launch. The large-chain bookstore underestimated attendance and had to ask him to bring an extra box of books for the signing. If not for his personal following and our combined publicity efforts, he might be like the majority of authors who show up to only a handful of dedicated fans.

Why bother with a social media campaign?

Today’s industry standard includes a social media campaign. I know, I know, you’re a writer not a Facebook positor of trivialities or a “Tweeter” of the banal. But, believe me when I say that publishing contracts are sometimes awarded to those who have built a large fan base proving that people are interested in them and what they have to say. Start with social media that you like and that makes sense for you. Make sure you’re targeting your audience – Facebook is known to be popular with women, Google+ with men. Today’s book publicity is fueled by social media. Try it – you might like it.

Media outreach isn’t important

Let’s face it – it’s hard to sell yourself. Everyone (or almost everyone) has trouble with self-promotion. But if you’re self-published or even if you aren’t, media outreach is a crucial part of standing out in your community and in the larger book world. Not only should you seek stories about yourself and your book or books but also the crucial reviews that can help launch you onto a larger platform.

You have to be on Oprah to achieve success

This is a famous battle cry for wanna be top-selling authors. The gold stamp of approval is being endorsed by Oprah and it is, of course. It’s just really, really hard to achieve and an unrealistic goal for a beginning or modestly successful author. Yes, it’s important to reach for the stars but keep your feet on the ground, too. Look for media opportunities in your local community or groups. Branch out from there with targeted outreach to media in ever widening circles and don’t give up. It’s usually just when you want to quit that you get that exciting phone call from a journalist or radio show host who is interested in interviewing you.

Garner book reviews by badgering reviewers

Reviewers are people, too, and usually very busy people. Treat these contacts with respect similarly to journalists who have limited time to find out about you unless you and your book are interesting to them. Find out if the reviewer covers your genre and work to develop a relationship with him or her. Send a personalized email asking if he would like a copy of your book (and in what format) and then follow-up. It’s a waste of a good book if you send it to a reviewer who isn’t interested or just doesn’t have time.

Book publicity isn’t selling

As an author, especially a self-published author, you are an entrepreneur with a product to sell. What you need to do is become comfortable with the process. Whether you’re promoting your book through social media, media outreach, with a book tour or signing, or by giving talks in your community and at conferences, you’re selling. And, the best part is that it’s something that you’re passionate about. Get out there and have fun!

 

Writing for Magazines: The Query and the Follow Up

covers-imageThere are many different ways to practice your writing craft, and writing for magazines is one that is very rewarding. Not only does magazine writing offer you a great platform to write, it also gives you the opportunity to work with different editors, get feedback on your writing, and of course, get paid!

One of the great things about writing for magazines, in addition to the above, is there are so many different publications out there, from consumer publications we’re all familiar with such as Redbook and Southern Living, to the free publications you find on the news rack at our grocery store. And then there’s the whole realm of niche publications, for antique car fanatics, cat lovers, or quilters, to name a few, and the world of business to business publications where you might find yourself writing about the latest technology used in making mattresses or tips on how to attract customers to your aquarium store.

To get started in the world of magazine writing, first you need to get an assignment, and unless you happen to know an editor, you’ll be sending out a few queries. Here are some tips on querying editors.

  1. Do your research. Look on the magazine’s website for an editorial calendar so you know what topics they’re interested in and when they’ll be published. Remember, magazines work ahead, so for example, a parenting magazine editor might be preparing the back-to-school issue in May.
  2. Don’t write an entire article. Come up with a few ideas that are well thought out, and write about a paragraph or two on each idea explaining the topic and how you would approach it.
  3. Do follow up. Persistence pays off in the world of magazines. Editors are busy people, and often they’ll read your email but not have time to respond. Keep track of when you send queries, and two weeks after your first email, send a follow up email to let the editor know you’re still interested. It won’t hurt to send another email again in a few weeks if you still haven’t heard from them. You never know when the email you send could happen to arrive right when they’re looking for one more article to fill up an issue. And sometimes, just the fact that you’ve emailed a few times will help them remember your name when it comes time for new assignments.

To learn more about writing for magazines, check out my video on the All About Writing page. This page is for members only, so subscribe today to take full advantage of everything All About the Authors has to offer.

Building your fan base means more readers!

writing-with-pen-3Where are you in your author journey? Did you know that marketing your book begins about the same time as writing your book or at least one year to six months before launch? Many authors are faced with this conundrum: if no one knows who you are, how will they buy your book? Traditional publishers also look to their authors to develop a following on their own. And, having an established following may be part of why an author is chosen for publication.

My name is Priscila Goudreau-Santos and I’m a Publicist and Marketing Specialist now living in Charlotte, NC.  I also specialize in book and author publicity. My background includes working as a journalist, public relations specialist and communications expert for a number of clients. I started my own business in 1996 and since then have been approached by many authors — both published and yet-to-be published writers who are asking for help in getting the word out about themselves and their books. How do you begin crafting your message and marketing strategy? It’s all about building your fan base…including social media networking, websites, blogs, and traditional press releases and media contacts.

First of all, how do you brand yourself? How do people find you or see you as different from others.  Set yourself apart from other authors by asking these questions:

  • How am I unique?
  • Why did I write my book?
  • Who is my market (including age group, gender and preferences)?

These are just some of the questions you should ask to find out who is your target and how do you reach them.

Next, formulate a marketing plan targeted to your audience. It sounds overwhelming task but it’s a lot easier to do it in steps. This centers around your Author Platform or (brand or position) where you chose your key message: religion, conservation, healthcare, intrigue, Sci-Fi, etc. What are you trying to say?

Then, make sure that you do what marketers of products do best by branding your image or message with colors or photos. If you use the same color, picture and message in all of your marketing and publicity, your fans will begin to recognize you. In the Carolinas, when you see a black panther with bright blue trim, do you think of the Carolina Panthers? And, the catch phrase says it all: Two States. One Team.

Next, choose the way that you’d like people to connect with you by choosing to create a website or blog. There are different websites that allow you to create your own website free of charge such as Wix.com or WordPress.com or you can hire a professional to help with the technical and creative aspects. You’ll want your vision to portray you and your book in a unique way that you like. If you like it, chances are your followers will like it, too.

Then, use this platform to launch social media that will further connect with your followers. It’s all about connections. Again, choose ones that you like and use and that your followers use. Using all the tools in the toolbox, start to think ahead to using traditional media like press releases, social media and other elements and how they all work together. For example, if you send out a press release announcing your book launch, make sure that you make this announcement on your social media as well. There’s so much competition for everyone’s attention that you have to repeat your message often and on as many channels as possible.

Be creative and have fun. Use videos to set your campaign apart that you can post on your website, in your blog or send via link to your fans. If pictures are part of your message, then set up a Pinterest site and ask your followers to join and pin pictures to your boards. Make your campaign as interactive as possible. There are so many creative ways to set yourself apart and get noticed.